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Beginners Guide To Roleplay

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Beginners guide to roleplay:

Here is a beginner’s guide to roleplay, in this infosheet I will tell you the basic steps to roleplay.

Step 1:

Think of how your character would sound in character: dialects, accents, speech impediments and tone all encompass a real life person, so it should be the same in roleplay. This can be done through dialogue such as: “‘Ello there, ‘ow’re yae?” Which conveys a more Northern English dialect, strongly associated with Dwarves, for example. Distinguishing how your character’s tone is conveyed or how to separate dialogue and emotes is shown in the next step.
Optional : Dialogue can be conveyed with or without quotation marks and is completely optional to the person roleplaying. It is not enforced to use or not use them, so feel free to develop your style.

Remember that when you’re talking to people for the first time, your character will not know of the person's name unless you have the said person in your backstory, or the person has consented to it. You are not a character in Minecraft, as it's simply the medium we use instead. So their ‘username’ is non-existent.

Step 2:


Emoting is another valuable aspect of roleplay, as it can convey action and tone, which is very important. People aren’t wooden, we all share small nuances and are never truly still when we speak to one another. Emoting this can bring your roleplay to the next level, making it that little extra detailed for the person you’re roleplaying with. For example: *Bob would walk into the tavern, he would quickly glance around the room before making his way over to the bar*. When emoting, consider reactions as a possibility. Other characters will need a chance to react to your presence or to your entrance, so try not to use too many actions in a singular emote. This creates a more fluid roleplay. In casual environments this is not a concern, however in combat roleplay this could be considered powergaming. To avoid powergaming, you wish to always give someone a reaction or chance, as you’d never be able to swing a sword at someone without some form of reaction. For example: *Bob swung his sword and cut off the head of his opponent*. This is an example of power gaming when using emotes. To correctly use an emote for this situation you would do as followed: “Bob would swung his sword in an attempt to behead his opponent*. This allows for the other person to retaliate and defend themselves from the attack.

If at any point you think that someone is trying to force emotes on you then please report it to a moderator with sufficient evidence and actions will be taken from there. If it is someone who is new to roleplay please give them a chance and tell them what they have done wrong so they can correct their mistakes.

Step 3:

Now that you’re knowledgeable on the basics of roleplay, you can begin to venture into the realm of Ventura and roleplay with the players.

When approaching someone, try to think of how your character would react. Make sure to emote approaching, as this may change the way the group reacts, for example: *Bobs strolls with a jovial chip in his step, curiously pausing at the group of strangers.* “Hello there, sorry to intrude chaps but I was wondering what we’re all gathered for?” This example offers a genial and warm air, someone who is happy and perhaps extravagant. The change in words can offer a mixed reaction, but also give insight to your character’s behaviours without being too direct. Subtle words and actions can go a long way during roleplay. If your character were to approach someone who is alone, you may roleplay: *Bob would find himself stopping before a stranger, to which he would tilt his head and make brief but passive eye contact with. He took a quick inhale, speaking up-* “Hello there chap, how’re you faring?” In this dialogue, the usage of ‘faring’ grounds the speech within the timeframe, which is medieval. This doesn’t mean you have to speak in Elizabethan Shakespearean, or Medieval tongue, but using small references such as ‘faring’ and ‘jest’ may prove to enhance your sentences, but also act as a synonym for the future.

Though not everyone will be roleplaying who you meet, there are a few ways of identifying non-roleplayers or Out Of Character (OOC) people :

  • DMing them and asking them if they are IC or not.
  • If they are wearing an OOC hat or a head on their head, which is clearly not their skin, then they will be out of character.
  • If they are doing things such as building or idly running about.

Rules of roleplay:

The rules and etiquette of roleplay are expansive and yet simple, mostly relying on common sense.
Combat Roleplay
For how to combat roleplay, please see this guide [here] . This is simply explaining certain rules which follow.

  1. When engaged in Combat, you cannot leave or choose not to roleplay during this time, as it would be considering combat logging and avoiding roleplay consequences. Not only is this a warnable offence, but it leaves the person you’re combatting with in an awkward position. In any instance where you have to leave - i.e an emergency or if the internet and computer cuts out - there is the possible option :
    1. You and the other combatant have agreed to come up with an ending which you both agree on.
    2. The combatant and you agree to halt the roleplay until a later date, further roleplay of those two characters will be suspended however as it may result in death, which would mean the roleplay after would need to be voided.
Should someone combat log with malicious intent or out of ‘rage,’ they will be given 10 minutes before the combatant they were versing is given free passage to do whatever they wish to the character. This rule is enforced to avoid people from avoiding Roleplay Consequence and cheating death or injuries.

Metagaming:

Metagaming is frowned upon in the roleplay communities, Ventura not being an exception. Taking Out of Character information and using it to an In Character advantage is considered metagaming and is punishable, as it breaks the barrier between yourself and your character, the barrier of Out of Character and In Character. For example: You’re in an event where there is an event creature, your character has no knowledge of the creature but you have read the lore, knowing they have magical properties despite no outward appearance. Your character then says, “Be careful, I think its magical!” Which, in this case, it has already been described as “no outwardly magical appearance.” This would be considered a more subtle way of metagaming, which is still as punishable as the more obvious ones.

Metagaming can become as subtle as reading another language which your character does not personally know, but you can read what that person is saying, so you have your character react in a way which would not make sense. Ensure that your character only knows and speaks the sensible languages pertinent to their race. Learning languages is a feat, but requires studying. Please check the languages lore page [here] for more.

Metagaming does not count if you want to roleplay with your friend. Asking someone to roleplay with you through DM or Discord is fine as long as it’s in a public area like a tavern or a city which their IC character would have ingame knowledge of. Loopholing this to aid a friend who is in combat will result in a warning.

Taking IC into OOC:

Another cardinal sin of roleplay is to let what has happened during roleplay affect how you treat someone out of character. You may feel aggravated or annoyed that someone has done something to hurt or kill your character, but you have to remember that this person is roleplaying and therefore does not have personal intent to harm your character or you. They did not act out of malice or personal hatred, but are simply role playing and acting out what their character would have done during the situation. It is warnable and unacceptable to treat someone unfairly due to roleplay circumstances, or even then taking that hatred back into character where it would be nonsensical, for example: Jim has killed Bob, so the person who made Bob then makes Mark, who hates Jim for no other reason than he killed Bob.If you think someone is being unfair or purposely going out of their way to hurt your character or your OOC feelings then don’t hesitate to contact a moderation member. Please never try to make a situation worse by retaliating out of malice, we want to keep the server and community friendly and non toxic.
 
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Book Of Ventura

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Accounts not registered on the Book of Ventura Website do not have access to our server lore. Now that you’re registered, you’ll be able to find all the lore you’ll need to make a character; there’s the geography of the world, the races, and the religious information you’ll need to start making a well-rounded character. Below are some pointers to help ease the process of character creation for you.

  • Unless a race says “Application Only” on the page or in the title, you can play it without applications. Metal Men are publicly playable, but if you want any sort of modifications to their body, you’ll need to take extra steps.
  • Races like the Aealim and modified Metal Men require Special Character Applications. In most cases, this is a Character Profile with their special traits/aspects explained and clearly displayed. After you’ve filed a Special Character Application, please wait until a Lore official interacts with the application before moving forwards.
  • Any “standard race” (non-application race) does not require a public profile on the forums. If you want to make one, feel free, but it is not required to begin Roleplay.
  • Backstories cannot include interactions with deities or event creatures, or rare flora/fauna.
  • Given the story of our server, we ask that you include some small details in your character’s backstory:
    • The character can have grown up anywhere listed in the Geography.
    • The backstory must end with the character moving to the island of Lunaris, whether it be by accident, choice, or force. From there, the character will be allowed to go back to the world unrestricted, unless events pose restrictions.
    • Magic cannot be included in the backstory in any way, shape, or form.
    • Characters cannot start with magic.
  • We do not restrict real-life cultural basis. While the server is largely European-themed, characters with an Asian or Middle-Eastern styled background will be permitted, given they fit the technology lock.
  • If you want any exceptions to the rules above, please speak to Lore Team and file a Special Character Application. Special Exception Character Applications will be treated on a case-by-case basis.
 
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